The Nerd RVT
Happy International Tiger Day!
"Hey, Bengal tiger, quit eating that pangolin! They’re endangered!"
"… so am I."
"oh, ok. Carry on, then."
Photo by Dibyendu Ash.

Happy International Tiger Day!

"Hey, Bengal tiger, quit eating that pangolin! They’re endangered!"

"… so am I."

"oh, ok. Carry on, then."

Photo by Dibyendu Ash.

eruditionanimaladoration:

So here’s where we keep all the feeder and breeder mice and rats.
Who gets what?
Well it’s Depending on the size of the animal eating. Some of the larger snakes, lizards and birds get a variety of size rats. Then the smaller snakes and birds would eat the mice.
and how long does it take a mouse…

I was once asked if the rabbits were baby kangaroos.

Andrew Haydon Park Ottawa Bird Day #Ottawa #bird #nature on Flickr.

With activists attacking the organization, Vancouver Aquarium is not sitting back as misinformation about them is spread.

"Before 1964, when the Vancouver Aquarium caught its first killer whale, B.C.’s fisheries managers had mounted a Browning .50 calibre machine gun at Seymour Narrows to cull the killer whales they believed were vicious predators."

Shark Week Countdown Challenge Day 13: Shark Guts!

Everyone is always obsessing over the pointy teeth of the stereotypical shark, but I’m here to tell you that the shark digestive tract is just as cool, if not cooler.

Rather than just having a big ol’ pile of intestines like us mammals do, the sharks (and a few other basal fish species) have evolved a ‘spiral valve intestine’, which basically takes a relatively simple looking tube-shaped piece of gut, and puts a spiral in it, to maximize absorption of nutrients while still minimizing the space used.

One downside of this funky gut adaptation is that it means sharks can’t actually pass big objects out of their stomach until they’re further broken down. This may be why we can sometimes find all manner of weird undigested items in the stomach of a shark.

Check out more info here (WARNING: photos of shark necropsy/dissection).

effyeahtorontozoo:

From the Toronto Zoo’s Facebook page:

Unlikely Animal Friends! If you have seen our wonderful beavers in the Americas Pavilion, you are aware that June and Ward, who share their habitat with snapping turtles and largemouth bass, are very easy going and spend a good part of the day snoozing in their den. It is no great secret that beavers have soft fur and this fact has not escaped the attention of our female snapping turtles, Glitter and Sparkles. The female turtles just happen to be small enough in diameter that they can swim up the tunnel leading to the beaver den and take advantage of this quiet place to have a nap. While this would be an extremely unlikely scenario in the wild, here at the Zoo our female snapping turtles and beavers have become friends. Who can blame the cold blooded turtles for taking advantage of the dark cozy den that just happens to have 2 warm blooded fur blankets to snuggle with.  These unusual and unlikely roommates have been sleeping side by side for years in our beaver lodge; which you can see from inside the Americas Pavilion!

effyeahtorontozoo:

From the Toronto Zoo’s Facebook page:

Unlikely Animal Friends!

If you have seen our wonderful beavers in the Americas Pavilion, you are aware that June and Ward, who share their habitat with snapping turtles and largemouth bass, are very easy going and spend a good part of the day snoozing in their den. It is no great secret that beavers have soft fur and this fact has not escaped the attention of our female snapping turtles, Glitter and Sparkles.

The female turtles just happen to be small enough in diameter that they can swim up the tunnel leading to the beaver den and take advantage of this quiet place to have a nap. While this would be an extremely unlikely scenario in the wild, here at the Zoo our female snapping turtles and beavers have become friends. Who can blame the cold blooded turtles for taking advantage of the dark cozy den that just happens to have 2 warm blooded fur blankets to snuggle with.

These unusual and unlikely roommates have been sleeping side by side for years in our beaver lodge; which you can see from inside the Americas Pavilion!

New England Aquarium on Flickr.

fromfantasytoreality:

nerdrvt:

Shark Week Countdown Challenge Day 12: Zebra Shark!

The zebra shark lives in the coastal regions of the Indian Ocean and the Western Pacific Ocean. They are a bottom dwelling, nocturnal species that maxes out at just under 8 feet long.

I know what you’re thinking. Have these people even seen a zebra? Well, the zebra shark gets it’s common name from the look of their babies, which are actually black and white striped. In fact, the babies look so different from the adults, that early taxonomists thought they were two different species altogether!

These sharks are listed as ‘Vulnerable’ by the IUCN due to coastal fisheries bycatch issues and the loss of their coral reef habitat. They pose no risk to humans if unprovoked.

Photos are mine, from Ripley’s Aquarium Toronto.

They’re called leopard sharks is Australia :) And diving with them is like diving in a fish tank. They’re so lovely. 

Aren’t common names funny sometimes? In North America, the common name ‘leopard shark’ refers to a completely unrelated species, Triakis semifasciata. They look like this:

Source: Wikipedia, user nugunslinger.

thatfishchick:

Wow, Day 12 already?!? Time is just flying by.

Speaking of flying by, I thought we could talk about my favorite question I ever got while volunteering at the aquarium.

"Is Sharknado possible?”

The question came from a little boy, maybe 8-10 n(I’m terrible with gauging ages, weights, and…

dynastylnoire:

jessehimself:

crowley-my-queen:

baka-kashi:

with-both-my-hearts:


sociallubrication:
The Lions Mane Jellyfish is the largest jellyfish in the world. They have been swimming in arctic waters since before dinosaurs (over 650 million years ago) and are among some of the oldest surviving species in the world.
 
DON’T

GET ME STARTED

ON THESE MOTHERFUCKERS

That is horrifying.


If that’s scary, than say hello to my little friend, the “Stygiomedusa gigantea.” This guy has only been spotted 18 times, and filmed only twice.Its is also about 6 meters long and about a meter wide. Sadly it doesn’t have stingers, but it will still eat. It kinda just engulfs all it’s prey. I’m not real sure.Aren’t Jellyfish so great? Because I think they are evil.

Jellyfish are actually the only creature we know of to have mastered total neurological regeneration as well as muscular regeneration, making them immortal.


NOPE

A number of those photos of the lion’s mane jelly are either photoshopped (poorly), or they are forced perspective images, making the animals look much bigger.
While some have been found with bell sizes larger than 2 feet in diameter, it’s rare. There was also one with a total length of about 120 feet found, that’s measuring the tentacles- but again, rare.
Generally the ones in warmer climes (where humans would encounter them in the water) average a max of 20 inches bell diameter.

dynastylnoire:

jessehimself:

crowley-my-queen:

baka-kashi:

with-both-my-hearts:

sociallubrication:

The Lions Mane Jellyfish is the largest jellyfish in the world. They have been swimming in arctic waters since before dinosaurs (over 650 million years ago) and are among some of the oldest surviving species in the world.

 

DON’T

image

GET ME STARTED

image

ON THESE MOTHERFUCKERS

image

That is horrifying.

If that’s scary, than say hello to my little friend, the “Stygiomedusa gigantea.” 



This guy has only been spotted 18 times, and filmed only twice.



Its is also about 6 meters long and about a meter wide. 
Sadly it doesn’t have stingers, but it will still eat. It kinda just engulfs all it’s prey. I’m not real sure.

Aren’t Jellyfish so great? Because I think they are evil.

Jellyfish are actually the only creature we know of to have mastered total neurological regeneration as well as muscular regeneration, making them immortal.

NOPE

A number of those photos of the lion’s mane jelly are either photoshopped (poorly), or they are forced perspective images, making the animals look much bigger.

While some have been found with bell sizes larger than 2 feet in diameter, it’s rare. There was also one with a total length of about 120 feet found, that’s measuring the tentacles- but again, rare.

Generally the ones in warmer climes (where humans would encounter them in the water) average a max of 20 inches bell diameter.