The Nerd RVT

Related to my previous post, I should mention that my photo set from the New England Aquarium is coming to an end- soon I’ll be sharing photos from my more recent zoo and aquarium trips, including:

- Ripley’s Aquarium Toronto

- Parc Safari, Hemmingford, QC

- Granby Zoo, Granby, QC

- Seattle Aquarium

- Woodland Park Zoo, Seattle

- Toronto Zoo (yes, again! I love TZ!)

I’m still editing a lot of these, and uploading them when I can. So sit tight!

jonathanmann:

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I love your photographs so much. I was wondering if you work at the New England Aquarium? Just wondering about your experience!

Aw, thanks! I wish I worked at NEAQ!

I’m actually an aquatics veterinary technician/aquatics biologist (depending on the day, hah!) at a university in Ottawa, Canada. I look after all of the fish, amphibians, and reptiles in the university’s facilities. I really love my job.

I’ve actually only visited NEAQ twice. I went in September 2013, and again of April this year. Hoping to visit again next April!

I have a pretty basic DSLR with a couple budget lenses. I still have a lot to learn about taking good pictures, and places like NEAQ can be challenging because of my camera’s serious difficulty with taking quality images in darker environments. I’m working on it! :)

Thanks again for your message! Made my night!

New England Aquarium on Flickr.
New England Aquarium on Flickr.
I know that it's very exciting working at a place that is similar to a marine park, but just think about the animals for a sec. Dolphins are highly intelligent mammals, and even though it may seem like they are happy because they are well fed, and have lots of interaction.. does not necessarily mean they are. I had the same mind set as you before I made the connection. I would recommend checking out some documentaries to educate yourself on all of this. There's lots if you just google it.

ktsaurusr3x:

nerdrvt:

oh-macaw-ed:

By working there you are indirectly funding the Japanese Dolphin slaughter. You can learn more about that by watching ‘The Cove’ ! It’s on youtube. I hope you look into this and stop funding marine parks and zoos! Animals are not ours to capture and breed! They belong in the wild! Please think about all of this.. have a good day!

It baffles me that people such as yourself seem to think you have this vast array of knowledge thanks to google, and know more than those of us who actually work in the animal field directly with the animals.

Secondly, no US parks have no connection or association with the cove or the drive fisheries in Asia. And unfortunately that documentary “The Cove” makes people believe that there is this connection there, but the US is not allowed to take any animals acquired through this method.

"Animals are not ours to capture and breed"

Let me tell you something about this comment, breeding in zoos and aquariums can be absolutely critical for certain species. Just yesterday I saw an animal that is 100% extinct in the wild, roaming through a section of a zoo. This animal is no longer alive in the wild, and the only living ones left can only been seen in a zoo. Without that zoo breeding, you can say goodbye to that species that would then be fully extinct.

In the end, it is you that needs to do the thinking and learn what is actually truthfully happening from people who physically care for these animals each and every day. Those are the people that are actually credible.

Gotta love it when people who have no formal experience working with animals try to tell us all how it is. Bring me some science, and stop sending me links to emotionally charged animal rights pieces.

(Honestly, I think sometimes scientists don’t have much of a clue either- I see a lot of them posting stuff from sites like The Dodo. Those of us on the ground working every day with these animals know where it’s at, though.)

Both the Dodo and Awesome Ocean are incredibly biased. Don’t accept either as a source. The rest of this response is great.

And if you have a problem with “taking and breeding animals”, better get rid of your pets, any meat in your fridge, wool or other animal products, and more.

Yes, The Dodo is terrible, and it makes me sad when I see scientists (who do animal work!) linking to it. I wish they realized that The Dodo is against animal research, and even working in the field with animals is still animal research…

I know that it's very exciting working at a place that is similar to a marine park, but just think about the animals for a sec. Dolphins are highly intelligent mammals, and even though it may seem like they are happy because they are well fed, and have lots of interaction.. does not necessarily mean they are. I had the same mind set as you before I made the connection. I would recommend checking out some documentaries to educate yourself on all of this. There's lots if you just google it.

oh-macaw-ed:

By working there you are indirectly funding the Japanese Dolphin slaughter. You can learn more about that by watching ‘The Cove’ ! It’s on youtube. I hope you look into this and stop funding marine parks and zoos! Animals are not ours to capture and breed! They belong in the wild! Please think about all of this.. have a good day!

It baffles me that people such as yourself seem to think you have this vast array of knowledge thanks to google, and know more than those of us who actually work in the animal field directly with the animals.

Secondly, no US parks have no connection or association with the cove or the drive fisheries in Asia. And unfortunately that documentary “The Cove” makes people believe that there is this connection there, but the US is not allowed to take any animals acquired through this method.

"Animals are not ours to capture and breed"

Let me tell you something about this comment, breeding in zoos and aquariums can be absolutely critical for certain species. Just yesterday I saw an animal that is 100% extinct in the wild, roaming through a section of a zoo. This animal is no longer alive in the wild, and the only living ones left can only been seen in a zoo. Without that zoo breeding, you can say goodbye to that species that would then be fully extinct.

In the end, it is you that needs to do the thinking and learn what is actually truthfully happening from people who physically care for these animals each and every day. Those are the people that are actually credible.

Gotta love it when people who have no formal experience working with animals try to tell us all how it is. Bring me some science, and stop sending me links to emotionally charged animal rights pieces.

(Honestly, I think sometimes scientists don’t have much of a clue either- I see a lot of them posting stuff from sites like The Dodo. Those of us on the ground working every day with these animals know where it’s at, though.)

Work in progress

nerdrvt:

I’m looking for registered vet techs doing less conventional jobs (non-clinic) to profile on my blog for NVTW! Drop me a line!

I’ve heard from a few people (and you’ll get my questions soon, I’m going to work on them over the weekend) but I’d love to hear from more people!

whatthefauna:

A gravid (pregnant) corn snake will find a warm, hidden location to lay and abandon her eggs. After about 10 weeks, the baby snakes begin to hatch, using a specialized scale called an “egg tooth” to tear out of the leathery shell. After their first meal of egg yolk, the snakes must rely on hunting instincts to find their own food.

Images: Seth Hall (1, 2)

Or, you know, some impatient jerk comes along and slashes the eggs open with a razor.

New England Aquarium on Flickr.